Browse: Glaciers and associated features

Yukon Territory, Canada
Aerial view of active alpine glaciers in the Canadian Rockies. Notice the crevasses and the ongoing formation of alpine glacial features.

Mount Rainier, Washington
Mt. Rainier is the most heavily glaciated mountain in the US 48 states. This view shows primarily the Emmons glacier, the largest on the mountain.
Mount Rainier, Washington
Looking down on Little Tahoma Peak (11,138'), where the Emmons Glacier (left) separates from the Ingraham glacier (right).
Zermatt, Switzerland
Thick glacial ice flowing over an ice fall. The ice cap on the highest peak is over 200 feet thick.
Zermatt, Switzerland
Aerial view of glacial ice approaching an ice fall. Note crevasses forming as the ice accelerates over the fall.

Matanuska Glacier, Alaska
View into the ice of the Matanuska Glacier. Note entrapped bubbles and sediment.

Matanuska Glacier, Alaska
Note the sediment being transported within the glacial ice.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
Numerous glaciers flow down the slopes of Mt. Rainier, Washington (14,410ft.). Moist Pacific air is forced to rise over the Cascade mountains, generating great snowfall that produces the many glaciers. This photo shows the Emmons Glacier as viewed from Sunrise. Little Tahoma Peak can be seen to the left (east) of Mt. Rainier.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
The snout of the Emmons Glacier, covered with sediment largely from the 1963 debris avalanche below Little Tahoma Peak on the flanks of Mt. Rainier.
Barry Glacier, Prince William Sound, Alaska
Note the layer of brittle ice with crevasses (top of glacier to a depth of approximately 100 feet) and the more solid "plastic" ice below that.
Sierra Nevada, California
Glacial striations, or scratches cut into granite bedrock by debris transported in the ice at the base of a glacier. Note two directions of striations, indicating two separate glacial advances. Camera lens cap for scale.
Sierra Nevada, California
Glacial plucking, or removal of bedrock from the down-slope side of a small bedrock hill or knob. Ice freezes to the rock and as the glacier flows downslope boulders are plucked free and incorporated into the ice. This photo immediately downslope of the striations in the previous photo.

Portage Lake, Alaska
Ice-polished rock outcrop along Portage Lake. Ice flow was from left to right.

Glacier National Park, Montana
Old Man Lake (a tarn) and the cirque in which it lies.

Glacier National Park, Montana 
Iceberg Lake, a tarn.

Central Colorado Rockies
Aerial view of several cirques along a mountain ridge. Note U-shaped valleys extend downslope from the cirques.
Rocky Mountains, Colorado
This cirque is cut into the slopes of Mt. Evans in the Front Range.
Rocky Mountains, central Colorado
The sharp ridge in the foreground is an arete. Both sides of the ridge are quite steep, having been eroded by alpine glaciers. The ski areas of Arapaho Basin, Keystone, and Breckenridge can be seen in the background.
Glacier National Park, Montana 
The Ptarmigan Wall is a good example of an arete.
Aletsch Glacier Region, Switzerland
This arete clearly separates two active glaciers.
Aletsch Glacier Region, Switzerland 
Here several small glaciers are separated by aretes.
Zermatt, Switzerland
The Matterhorn is a classic horn, a steep, faceted mountain having been eroded on several sides by glaciers.
Zermatt, Switzerland
The “back side” or southeastern view of the Matterhorn.
Glacier National Park, Montana 
Mt Flinsch and Old Man Lake, a tarn.
Snowy Mountains, Montana
An especially well-formed U-shaped valley near Yellowstone National Park. Both a stream and a road now occupy the bottom of this glacial valley.
Yosemite National Park, California
The U-shaped Yosemite Valley is famous for the sheer granite cliffs and Half Dome towering above the valley floor.
Glacier National Park, Montana 
The U-shaped valley of McDonald Creek, occupied by Lake McDonald in the background.
Glacier National Park, Montana 
The many lakes of Swiftcurrent Creek, occupying a U-shaped valley.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
The Nisqually glacier is currently eroding bedrock beneath the ice. One can imagine the shape of the valley beneath being slowly broadened into a classic U-shaped glacial valley.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
The Nisqually River valley, just downstream of the present glacier terminus. Note the freshly eroded trim line indicating the recent extent of glacial ice further down-valley.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
The Nisqually River
reworks the sediment delivered by the Nisqually glacier, producing an outwash deposit.
Glacier National Park, Montana 
A hanging valley can be seen in the upper right quadrant of the photo.
Yosemite National Park, California
Bridal Veil Falls is a classic hanging valley, with a waterfall dropping to Yosemite Valley.

Prince William Sound, Alaska 
A small hanging glacier above the main valley occupied by the fiord.

Kenai Fiords National Park, Alaska 
Aialik Glacier, responsible for cutting the fiord beyond the present glacial terminus.

Kenai Fiords National Park, Alaska 
Holgate Glacier, responsible for cutting the fiord beyond the present glacial terminus.

Anchorage, Alaska and Region 
Satellite image of Anchorage, AK region. Note Cook Inlet (SW, lighter blue tone), and Prince William Sound (SE, darker blue tone). Matanuska Glacier is in the NE portion of the image.

Prince William Sound, Alaska (College Fiord) 
Harvard glacier. Note the well-developed medial moraines.

Rocky Mountain Front Range, Colorade
Till exposed in a road cut on Mount Evans. Note the wide range of particle sizes in this unsorted glacial sediment.

Echo Lake, Colorado
This lateral moraine formed along the side of glaciers several thousands of years ago and now dams a small watershed, creating Echo Lake.

Hamburg, Germany
A large glacial erratic locally known as "The Swede." Pleistocene glaciers transported this 5m boulder from Sweden to the valley of the Elbe River in northern Germany.

Matanuska Glacier, Alaska 
Note the clean ice (right) and debris-covered ice (left), with a terminal moraine just beyond the modern glacier.

Matanuska Glacier, Alaska 
Note the terminal moraine continuing to form in front of the glacier.

Prince William Sound, Alaska (College and Harriman Fiords) 
This marine chart indicates submerged terminal moraines (shown as light blue, indicating shallow water) at the mouth of each fiord.

Resurrection Bay, Alaska 
Terminal moraine with a “ghost forest” of trees that died after subsidence during the 1964 earthquake exposed their roots to salt water.

Zermatt, Switzerland
Sediment deposits known as lateral moraines can be seen flanking the sides of this valley glacier. Also note the crevasses where the slope flattens out and ice is forced to decelerate.
Zermatt, Switzerland
Extensive lateral moraines extending further down-valley than the present position of the valley glacier.
Mt. Rainier, Washington
Note the well-developed lateral moraine to the right of the lower Emmons Glacier.

Prince William Sound, Alaska (College Fiord) 
Coxe Glacier, Barry Arm of Prince William Sound, AK. Note the lateral moraine and subglacial meltwater flow on the right.

Yukon Territory, Canada
Aerial view of active alpine glaciers in the Canadian Rockies. Notice the medial moraines.

Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland 
Note the well-developed medial moraines formed by three separate glaciers combining to form the Aletsch Glacier, the longes glacier in the Alps.

Prince William Sound, Alaska (College Fiord) 
Harvard glacier. Note the well-developed medial moraines on the glacier and within the iceberg in the foreground.

near Sun Prairie, southern Wisconsin
A drumlin can be seen in the background of this photo.
Kettle Moraine State Park, southeastern Wisconsin
The rolling hills in the background of this photo are drumlins.
southern Wisconsin
A sand and gravel quarry has exposed the sediments that make up this drumlin. Note that drumlins are deposits formed by continental glaciers.
Kettle Moraine State Park, southeastern Wisconsin
The lake in the background is a kettle.

Southern Canadian Prairies
Aerial view of kettle lakes.

Yukon Territory, Canada
Aerial view of glacial valleys and braided streams transporting outwash away from the glacial terminus.

Matanuska River, Alaska 
Several miles below the Matanuska Glacier, the Matanuska River transports an enormous load of outwash. Note the loess deposits in the exposed bluff (foreground) and the terrace just beyond the river.

Matanuska River, Alaska 
Sediment exposure along the Matanuska River several miles below the Matanuska Glacier. Note the fine sands at the top overlying loess, then till.